Corpus Christi College Oxford

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Law 

 


Rhiannon


law.student@ccc.ox.ac.uk


Hi, I’m Rhiannon from Oldham in Greater Manchester. I am a first year Law student at Corpus.


When I applied to Oxford I submitted an open application and was assigned to Corpus Christi for interview. Having looked around Corpus in Year 11 as part of an outreach programme with my school, this was quite the coincidence, but I couldn’t have been happier. Corpus is a small college; both in terms of grounds and the number of students. The atmosphere is really friendly and there is always something going on; from welfare teas, to sports and societies to the annual tortoise fair, making Corpus a fun community to be part of.


The interview process seemed so daunting but was actually a really enjoyable experience. Interviews provide an opportunity to experience Oxford lifestyle and meet new, likeminded, people to yourself. Prior to the actual interview the tutors met with all the prospective students and explained what would happen meaning everyone knew what to expect. The interview is similar to a tutorial, allowing you to experience how teaching works in Oxford.


In the first year of the Oxford Law course, you study three subjects: Constitutional Law, Roman Law and Criminal Law, which you’ll be examined on during second term through moderation exams (Mods). This allows Law students to enjoy the Summer term without having to revise for exams, making it easier to settle into the more difficult parts of the course. Most people when they envisage law, think of criminal law usually framed in the context of television dramas, but law is so much more than this. Roman law allows you to explore a complete private legal system without the constant changes as seen in modern private law. This is really interesting as you can understand how and why different areas of the law develop as they do. Similarly, constitutional law shows the balance of law in society and how social and political factors influence this. Constitutional law is especially exciting due to the outcome of the European referendum, which allows students to see new academic and legal ideas on Europe as they emerge.  Teaching in Oxford is tutorial based with lectures to supplement this. This means that between each tutorial Law students have a reading list of cases and articles and use this information to write an essay. The essay is then marked and the different themes discussed in a small group with your tutor.


With law, there are no required A-levels and most students come to Oxford with very little legal knowledge. The important thing is that you find the concept of the law exciting and have an enthusiasm to learn more about it. Oxford work is difficult and it is this excitement and curiosity that make any university course enjoyable.


Beyond studying, Oxford is an incredible university and city to get involved with all sorts of activities. Both Corpus and the university offer a huge variety of sports teams and societies meaning there really is something for everyone. Oxford itself is also an amazing city with so much to see and do. Two of my personal favourites are the Ashmolean museum and punting on the river in the summer (or more being punted). With a more legal slant Oxford offers various legal societies including the university law society and the Bar society. Both hold huge numbers of events each year, including balls, meals and lectures. At Corpus, the newly founded Fredrick Pollock Law society also offers lots of different law based events to get involved with.


If you have any questions please drop me an email and I look forward to hearing from you!

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